CSS animations:

Make it possible to animate transitions from one CSS style configuration to another. CSS animations are made up of two basic building blocks. The first is the style that will be applied to an element at various points during the animation. The second is a set of keyframes that define what styles will be applied at specific points during the animation.

When an element is rendered by the browser, it will initially have some default styles — a default background color, for example — but once you start using CSS to style elements, those default styles will usually be overridden. Animations provide a way to transition smoothly from the element’s current styles to the new styles you’re defining.

The animation style is defined using the animation CSS properties, which is a shorthand property for eight different animation properties:

animation-name

animation-duration

animation-timing-function

animation-delay

animation-iteration-count

animation-direction

animation-fill-mode

animation-play-state

The keyframes that define the animation are created using the @keyframes at-rule. The animation style is then applied to an element using the animation CSS property, and the animation will start playing as soon as the element is rendered by the browser.

because CSS animations are applied to elements after they are rendered by the browser, they can sometimes cause a slight delay in the rendering of the page. This is usually not a problem, but if you have a page with many elements that are animating, it can be a good idea to use the animation-delay property to stagger the start of the animations.

Animations are a great way to add some visual interest to your web pages. CSS provides a number of ways to create animations, and the Animate-CSS library makes it easy to create CSS animations with just a few lines of code.

To use animate-CSS, simply include the library in your page and then add the “animated” class to the elements you want to animate. You can also add the “infinite” class to make your animation loop indefinitely.

Here’s an example of a simple animation using animate-css:

<div class="animated">

<p>This element will bounce up and down</p>

</div>

The Animate-CSS library provides a number of different animation classes, so you can create all sorts of different effects. To see a complete list of animation classes, check out the Animate-CSS documentation.

Animations can also be triggered by user interactions, such as hovering over an element. To do this, simply add the “animate-on-hover” class to your element.

<div class="animate-on-hover">

<p>This element will bounce up and down when you hover over it</p>

</div>

You can also chain multiple animations together by adding multiple animation classes to your element.

<div class="animated animate-on-hover">

<p>This element will bounce up and down, and then swing from side to side when you hover over it</p>

</div>

FadeIn CSS Animation:

One of the most popular animation techniques is fade-in animation. This is where an element fades in slowly and then becomes visible. CSS animation makes it possible to animate elements without using JavaScript. To create a fade-in animation with CSS, you first need to create a keyframe animation. Keyframe animation is an animation that is defined by a set of keyframes, or starting and ending points.

In your keyframe animation, you will need to set the opacity of your element to 0%. This is because you want your element to start out invisible. Then, you will need to set the opacity to 100% at the end of the animation. This is what will make your element fade in slowly.

You can also use the animation-delay property to delay the start of your animation. This can be useful if you want your animation to start after a certain amount of time has passed. Once you have created your keyframe animation, you need to apply it to your element. You can do this by using the animation property.

Here is an example of a fade-in animation that has a delay of 2 seconds:

animation: fadeIn 2s;

animation-delay: 2s;

In this example, the animation will start 2 seconds after the page loads. If you want your animation to start immediately, you can remove the animation-delay property. You can also change the duration of your animation. In the example above, the animation lasts for 2 seconds. But you can make it last longer or shorter by changing the number. For example, if you want your animation to last 4 seconds, you would use this:

animation: fadeIn 4s;

You can also change the timing function of your animation. The timing function controls the speed of your animation. There are a few different timing functions that you can choose from.

Here is an example of a fade-in animation with a linear timing function:

animation: fadein 2s linear;

The linear timing function will make your animation happen at a constant speed. If you want your animation to start slowly and then speed up, you can use the ease-in timing function.

Here is an example of a fadeIn animation with an ease-in timing function:

animation: fadein 2s ease-in;

You can also use the animation-fill-mode property to control what happens when your animation ends. The animation-fill-mode property can be used to make an element keep its final state after the animation has finished.

Here is an example of a fade-in animation with a fill mode of forwards:

animation: fadein 2s linear;

animation-fill-mode: forwards;

In this example, the element will keep its opacity at 100% after the animation has finished. If you want the element to return to its original state after the animation has finished, you can use the animation-fill-mode property backward.

Here is an example of a fade-in animation with a fill mode of backward:

animation: fadein 2s linear;

animation-fill-mode: backward;

You can also use the animation-iteration-count property to control how many times your animation plays. The animation-iteration-count property can be used to make an animation play infinitely.

Here is an example of a fade-in animation with an iteration count of infinite:

animation: fadein 2s linear;

animation-iteration-count: infinite;

All these are CSS animation examples.

We hope this article helped you. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment below. Thanks for reading!

 

 

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